Writing Retreat

I have just got back from a few days in the glorious English countryside; Holton in Somerset to be precise. This is a small little village about 7 miles from Wincanton. Not that I was actually in the village. I was about 1/2 mile outside the metropolis, house and pet sitting.

My main charge was Chiecco (pronounced Checko), a young energetic black labrador who ensured that I got out and about at least twice a day. Most of the rest of the time I spent writing and editing my planned book on Mindful Photography.

Some solid progress was made. I have re-structured the content, dumped a lot of the autobiographical stories and re-written much of the second half. I have almost completed 6 out of the 7 planned chapters, which is more than I anticipated at the beginning of the process, and I am pleased with the way it is shaping up. I have not counted yet, but there must be around 20 or so photography practices, all of which are designed to encourage the development of mindfulness through photography.

The next stage will be sending it to reviewers and getting some feedback. So if you feel this is something that you would be interested in please contact me.

Whilst I was there I practised what I preach and the photos below are a selection of favourites from several mindful photography practices around the area.

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Develop mindfulness through photography

My thoughts of late have been much around how I can share more effectively what I have developed. It has taken me 55 years of living, a couple of years of development, an online course, live workshops and some significant life events to really bring my thinking on delivering mindfulness through photography – or Mindful Photography as I usually call it – into a coherent whole.

I now believe that I have reached a key point. I have several live workshop sessions I can now deliver anywhere, and I have three planned for September and October in Swansea, Porthcawl and Cardiff. I have an 8 week Mindful Photography Course planned and have started to approach private, public and third sector organisations with a view to delivering this course for their staff, volunteers or participants. This week and next I am re-visiting the work I have created to date on my Mindful Photography book and once I have completed a second draft I am hoping to re-develop an online course.

It remains a challenge to develop and deliver all of this whilst still working part time, but regular income is of course essential. Keeping all of this on track, whilst also working through personal challenges and falling in love provides rich territory for practice. I try to sit quietly once a day and also share my gratitudes for the day with my sister (in Canada). These are practices that keep me present with all that is passing through.

Lately, I have been reading a passage from a book just after I have sat. The book is called Perseverance by Margaret J Wheatley and she shares little vignettes and quotes a page at a time that build towards a way of living with challenge. This morning’s offering included this quote below which summarises clearly how I believe our life is, and it is also enlivening to see yourself as a warrior. In fact, I imagine that I am a spiritual warrior and that my offering of Mindful Photography is my way of sharing that potential with the rest of the world.

“The basic difference between and ordinary person and a warrior is that a warrior takes everything as a challenge, whilst an ordinary person takes everything as a blessing or a curse.”

Don Juan, Carlos Casteneda

 

 

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Mindful Photography Walking

Once a week I intend to get out with my camera and do a mindful photography practice. This involves walking with my camera, following the 4 Stage Seeing Practice – always returning to the visual feast before me when my mind drifts off – and then creating a small set of photos that reflects that experience.

More often than not this happens on a dog walk. This morning was no exception and I chose to just centre upon my stroll along Swansea beach from the entrance opposite Singleton Park down to the small stream towards Mumbles. Limiting the space you practice is a fine way of grounding yourself and noticing more.

I find these little practices really helpful in reminding me what it is to pay attention and of course they also provide me with some photos I can share. This morning’s selection have a theme of simplicity and clarity. Something that is foremost in my mind at present. I hope that you like them.

If you would like to learn more about Mindful Photography then take a look at my Workshops page.

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A little practice

Usually when I deliver a workshop I do the activities whilst the students are out and about creating their own photos. This idea that everybody in the room does the activities provides a common reference point for discussion later when we feedback our favourites. But it does mean that only one or two of the photos from each person’s set gets shared.

Last month, during a workshop with the Swansea Carers, I did the first activity ’10 photos in 100 yard space’ in the old Pilkington Glass Factory, behind the Dylan Thomas Centre. It is now used as an overflow car park but the shell of it has not been touched.

I really liked the slightly abstract set I created so I thought that I would share some of them here. I particularly like the ‘Boots’ photo with its echoes of abandoned work boots and a little self reflection. Nothing is forever huh?

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