5 Benefits of Daydreaming

I have had two conversations with close friends in the last week where we have discussed the absence of daydreaming from our lives. This has set me thinking and daydreaming!

Being a man of late middle age, I remember a time before smartphones, computers and being constantly connected. In that space I daydreamed more; stared out of windows and contemplated, or just sat there and noticed what was going on around me. I believe that daydreaming has particular benefits that are being overlooked in our busy world. In fact I believe that they may help you cope with your crazy, busy, fully engaged world.

  1. Screen free time. I am never far from a screen. My smartphone is usually next to me, most of my work is online and I watch TV to relax. I have noticed though that when I sit for 10 minutes with just a cup of tea and no smartphone, computer or TV that I daydream, that other thoughts and feelings arise, that other possibilities emerge. Constant stimulation from a screen robs me of the other possible benefits of daydreaming.
  2. Rest, relax and recuperate. You are always busy. 10 minutes away from the striving to get something done will not make a big difference. I know, sometimes it might. But usually, 10 minutes spent relaxing will benefit you far more than another 10 minutes wrapped up in the striving.
  3. Clear the clutter. If you collect slow moving water from a pond or lake in a glass it will look murky. 10 minutes later it may be crystal clear. The floating residue will settle on the bottom of the glass. Daydreaming allows the head noise space to settle. Of course it might not for happen in the first 10 minutes, because that stream of consciousness in your mind is used to racing fast downstream. However, the more often you sit and daydream the more likely you are to notice the noise, and just in the noticing you are making a space for it to settle.
  4. Create space. If you create more unstimulated space, thoughts and feelings will rise in your conscious mind. These may be welcome visitors, or they may be undesirable guests. My first action is to notice where my mind has gone. If I don’t like the ruminative thoughts I choose to focus on a physical sensation; the tea on my lips, the sun on my face or just my body on its seat. This allows the thought to dissolve, although some thoughts may require more returns to the physical than others! However, there is also an uplifting side to this creation of space; positive thoughts, feelings and creative ideas may emerge. These can be cultivated and explored, whilst you sip your tea and notice your mind suggest that you take out your phone and take notes!
  5. Develop a creative idea. This period of daydreaming can be used to deliberately explore a creative idea or challenge. This is a space, without any other stimulation when you allow your mind to roam around the shape of an idea or challenge. During this exploration you notice any tendency to focus on the negative, balancing those thoughts with the potential, the positive and the beneficial.

Can you think of any more benefits? Me? I’m off to sit with a cup of tea and no phone!

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