In my new eBook – Mindful Photography: How to use photography to develop mindfulness (published later this month!) I share 16 Mindful Photography Practices. Each one is designed to hone a photography skill and develop mindfulness. I promised to share one from the new eBook so here it is.

Mindful Photography Practice – Ordinary Beauty

This activity was inspired by a quote from John Updike who encouraged us to “give the mundane its beautiful due.”

The intentions of this practice are to slow you down, improve your seeing and to create some visually stimulating photos of an ordinary subject. Once again though, whilst the photos are your outcome, the primary focus is in developing your ability to see what is in front of you. The practice is the thing, not the outcomes. Take your time. There is no time frame for this activity. Attend to the visual: the light, shapes, colours etc. Practice seeing like a camera.

  1. For this practice it is helpful if the viewscreen is not available for review. All digital cameras allow you to control whether the photo pops up after you have taken it, and how long it stays on the screen. This can be turned off. Then you can use to screen to compose your photo, but you can’t see the result.
  2. Set your camera to a mode that you are familiar with and you can use instinctively. Auto is great.
  3. Use the camera at one focal length. Do not zoom in and out.
  4. As you walk through your location do not look for a photo. Observe what is around. Wait for something to catch your eye, then stop and create a photo.
  5. Do not look at the photos you create. Notice your thoughts.
  6. Choose a subject that could be described as ‘boring’. A vehicle, building, room, sink, bicycle, chair, staircase, escalator etc.
  7. Walk all around your subject following the 4 Stage Seeing Practice.
  8. Wait for that flash of perception.
  9. Get really close.
  10. Frame really tightly.
  11. Do not include anything extra.
  12. Move your body. Change your point of view. Get high. Get low. Get interesting.
  13. Create up to 20 photos that challenge the viewer to identify the object.
  14. Finish the activity, sit quietly and review your photos.
  15. Share your favourite photo.
  16. Repeat the activity with another subject.

More Mindful Photography Practices

There are more Mindful Photography Practice available in my free eBook. Do download it!

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