Where the light gets in – Photo Activity

I have recently shared this with my newsletter subscribers, but I thought that at this time it may be beneficial for you all.

This photo activity is a response to the Covid-19 pandemic and is inspired by three lines from Anthem, by Leonard Cohen:

Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything (there is a crack in everything)
That’s how the light gets in

  1. Allocate one hour for a photo walk from your house.
  2. You will only create 10 photo in this hour, so take it slow.
  3. No reviewing. No deleting.
  4. Before you start sit quietly at home for 5 to 10 minutes thinking about how the Covid-19 pandemic is making you feel and Leonard’s lines of hope. Jot down your thoughts and feelings on a sheet of paper.
  5. Fold up the paper and place it in a pocket.
  6. Choose a camera and lens set up you are most familiar with – your ‘walkabout’ choice.
  7. Set the camera up in a mode that you can use instinctively.
  8. Walk and follow the Four Stage Seeing Practice: Anchor; Seeing; Resting and Creating. (see below).
  9. Keep a mental note of the number of photos you have created.
  10. If you forget the count, review the photos in your mind, visualising where you stopped to create each photo.
  11. Take your time. Instinctive and contemplative photography is your goal.
  12. Stop occasionally and review your sheet of paper.
  13. When you complete the activity and return home reward yourself with your favourite hot beverage and a treat. Do not review your photos yet. Notice the nagging voice! Allow the experience to settle whilst you drink.
  14. Later review your photos and notice your judging mind.
  15. Consider the photos you are drawn to and notice if you do not like some of your photos.
  16. Share your favourite photo in the Photography for Well-Being Facebook group or with me via return of this email.

Here is my favourite photo, a multi exposure in camera to reflect the light and dark.

 

Follow this Four Stage Seeing Practice to develop your ability to see everything that is there, enabling seeing to become a mindful experience when you are creating photographs.

  1. Anchor – When you arrive at your location take a moment. Sit somewhere and observe. Notice the breeze on your cheek and the smells that surround. Then tune into your visual experience. Notice the colours, lines, shapes, textures and depth. Notice where the sun is and the direction of light. Notice bright areas and shadows. If it is cloudy notice how this affects the scene. Spend at least 5 minutes paying attention to what you can see. Whenever you notice your mind thinking, about the photos you are creating, about what you are having for tea, about how daft you feel, return to what you can see. This is your anchor. Throughout your practice return to what you can see.
  1. Seeing – Walk at a gentle pace observing, but not looking for a photo opportunity. The photograph will find you. This is a challenge. There is a difference between attentive observation and looking for a photograph. The difference is the practice. All you have to do is to amble and observe; wait for something to catch your eye. This is to be a natural occurrence. Trust that something visually stimulating will arrive. This is all. You are attuned to your visual experience. Something will suggest itself as a photographic opportunity. When it does, stop.
  1. Resting – Look at what stopped you. Really look. Stay with the visual experience and breathe. Try to remain free from thoughts, ideas, action, consideration or internal chatter. Particularly notice any photographic thinking that creeps in. Just come back to the visual experience.
  1. Creating – Before you bring your camera up to your eye consider how you will use the camera’s frame to create an equivalent photo of what stopped you. Do you need to move in or out? What is in the frame? What is not in the frame? Do not over think the photo to create a ‘better’ image. Press the shutter and receive the photo. Then walk on.

Take your time with this practice. Slow, contemplative photography is your aim. Always come back to what you can see. This is my refrain, “What can I see?” Every time I notice photo thinking or my busy mind, I come back to what I can see.

 

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